2013 Aug 18 By Blake 0 comment
Just read a 9News article about about a near fatality of a pedestrian walking in front of traffic.  I then Googled and found a Denver Post article about more statistics of traffic vs peditrain vs cyclist casualties. What was interesting to me was that a hyperloop system enables easier further distance travel, but it also might change fatalities for shorter distances.

“Colorado’s total traffic deaths have tumbled 44 percent since 2002, but deaths of pedestrians are up 9.8 percent and cyclist deaths are up 44 percent.” 
Further in the article …”“We’re not adequately funding basic repairs on some of our roads,” said the Boulder Democrat. “And we’ve got a lot of needs for the funds we have.””

Clearly if a hyperloop system is implemented and it is successful with lots of people using it, it will change the way CDOT and Colorado’s Statewide Traffic Records Advisory Committee work in keeping people safe. 

However, Currently they do not have the data on Colorado traffic accidents to provide a knowledge guess on how a Colorado Hyperloop system will affect these statistics. 

Thus, I agree with Joey Bunch, the The Denver Post reporter, that “If legislators found more money for records, Meyer would invest in hiring more records staff, then moving all state law enforcement agencies to electronic records submissions, like the one used by Minnesota and other states.” Because, “Law enforcement, traffic planners and politicians are looking at ways to respond — and looking more than ever for data to provide insight into causes that could identify a path to solutions.”
The Hyperloop system will force the cities to bulster their public, short distance, transportation options (like bus, lightrail, cycling and walking paths, taxi stands, and other connections like to airports). Hopefully it will also force them to get into collecting data and statistics for e-goverment more efficiently.

Leave a Reply